Disability Services – Education is Accessible

The Academic Advising and Success Center works closely with the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services, related federal agencies and other organizations that provide service/aid to disabled individuals in order to provide the fullest range of services possible. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (117 kB) and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 (117 kB) prohibit discrimination in the recruitment, admission, and treatment of students with disabilities. Students with qualified and documented disabilities may request accommodations which will enable them to participate in and benefit from educational programs and activities. Students must provide appropriate documentation of the disability, complete an application for special accommodation/modification, and schedule and participate in an interview with a Hill College academic advisor. Every effort will be made to identify needs and provide any reasonable academic accommodation that a student needs due to his/her disability.

Documentation Guidelines

Students who are seeking support services on the basis of diagnosed disability are required to submit documentation to verify eligibility under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. This documentation needs to be recent, preferably within the last three years. Disability documentation for the purpose of providing accommodations must both establish disability and provide adequate information on the functional impact of the disability so that effective accommodations can be identified.  In the context of postsecondary education, documentation should provide a decision-maker with a basic understanding of the individual's disability and enough information to anticipate how the current impact of the disability is expected to interact with the institution's structure of courses, testing methods, program requirements, etc.

What are accommodations?

Accommodations are supports and services for qualifying students with disabilities in order to provide equal access and opportunities to benefit from classes, programs and activities. Academic accommodations must be authorized by the Academic Advising and Success Center and are determined on an individual basis.  

Accommodations Flyer

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For more information or to make a request for accommodations, contact the Academic Advising and Success Center:

Johnson County Campus:  817-760-5655, Lynne Percival
Hill County Campus:  254- 659-7655, Traci Brown
Burleson Center:  817-760-5542, Carol Jackson


Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Documentation Guidelines

In order to fully evaluate requests for accommodations or auxiliary aids and to determine eligibility for services, Hill College requires documentation of your disability. The documentation you provide should include an evaluation by an appropriately licensed professional who has direct experience in working with an adult population. The documentation must make evident the current impact of the disability as it relates to the accommodation(s) requested and include a description of any and all functional limitations. Those accommodations prescribed are provided so that students have equal access to activities and programs. Documentation should be on letterhead and contain the professional's signature and license number. The evaluator must be impartial and not related to the student being evaluated.

The general guidelines listed below are developed to assist you in working with our staff to prepare the information needed to evaluate your request(s).

Documentation

Documentation should be within the past three (3) years and completed by a licensed psychiatrist, psychologist, or other appropriately licensed practioner who is qualified to assess individuals with ADD/ADHD. If an evaluation has not been done within the past three (3) years, students should submit their most recent documentation for consideration. Documentation validates the functional limitations, which allows consideration for accommodation requests. Each request will be evaluated on a case by case basis. Documentation should include but is not limited to: 

  • A complete DSM diagnosis must be provided with an accompanying description of the specific symptoms that the student experiences. The diagnosis should be based upon a comprehensive clinical interview and/or psychological testing when testing is clinically appropriate. 
  • A complete description of the functional limitation(s) as they impact the student's academic functionality in the classroom. This can include impact upon classroom behavior, study stills, test taking and time management. 
  • Suggestions of reasonable accommodation(s) which might be appropriate at the post secondary level are encouraged. These recommendations should be supported by the diagnosis.

General Guidelines for Disabilities

It is important to recognize that accommodation needs can change over time and are not always identified during the initial diagnostic process. A prior history of accommodation, without demonstration of current need, does not in and of itself warrant the provision of a like accommodation. 

Autism Spectrum Disorder Documentation Guidelines


In order to fully evaluate requests for accommodations or auxiliary aids and to determine eligibility for services, Hill College requires documentation of your disability. The documentation you provide should include an evaluation by an appropriately licensed professional that makes evident the current impact of the disability as it relates to the accommodation(s) requested and include a description of any and all functional limitations. The diagnostician must have comprehensive training in the field of Autism Spectrum and other developmental disorders and direct experience in working with an adult population (when applicable).

Pervasive developmental disorders are characterized by severe and pervasive impairment in several areas of development including reciprocal social interaction skills, communication skills, or the presence of stereotyped behavior, interests, and activities. such documentation should be on letterhead and contain the professional's signature and license number. The evaluator must be impartial and not related to the person be evaluated. 

The general guidelines listed below are developed to assist you in working with our staff to prepare the information needed to evaluate your request(s).

Documentation

Because developmental disorders such as Autism Spectrum Disorder and other developmental disorders often originate in childhood, information demonstrating a history of impaired functioning beginning in childhood should also be provided. 

Documentation validates the functional imitations, which allows consideration for accommodation requests. Each request will be evaluated on a case by case basis. Documentation should include but is not limited to: 

  • History of impaired communication, social and academic functioning. Because Autism Spectrum Disorders are often manifested during childhood (though not always diagnosed), historical information regarding the individual's communication, social and academic history in elementary, secondary and post secondary education should be documented and provided.
  • Relevant academic data including past evaluations, academic history, and approved academic accommodations, is also assisting. 
  • The evaluator should describe the current degree of impact of the diagnosed Autism Spectrum Disorder or other pervasive development disorder has on a specific major life activity as well as its impact in a postsecondary setting.
  • Suggestions of reasonable accommodation(s) which might be appropriate at the post secondary level are encouraged. These recommendations should be supported by the diagnosis. 

General Guidelines for Disabilities

It is important to recognize that accommodation need can change over time and are not always identified during the initial diagnostic process. A prior history of accommodation, without demonstration of current need, does not in and of itself warrant the provision of a like accommodation. 

Blind and Low Vision Documentation Guidelines

In order to fully evaluate requests for accommodations or auxiliary aids and to determine eligibility for services, Hill College requires documentation of your disability. The documentation you provide should include an evaluation by an appropriately licensed professional who has direct experience in working with an adult population (when applicable). The documentation must make evident the current impact of the disability as it relates to the accommodation(s) requested and include a description of any and all functional limitations. Professional conducting assessments and rendering diagnoses must be qualified to do so. Documentation should be on letterhead and contain the professional's signature and license number. The evaluator must be impartial and not related to the student being evaluated.

The general guidelines listed below are developed to assist you in working with our staff to prepare the information needed to evaluate your request(s).

Documentation

Documentation validates the functional limitations, which allows consideration for accommodation requests. The currency of documentation is dependent upon the nature of the loss of vision. Thus, if the condition that leads to the loss of vision is progressive, updated documentation may be needed. Each request will be evaluated on a case by case basis. Documentation should include but is not limited to: 

  • A clear statement of a visual disability with supporting data.
  • A summary of present symptoms which meet the criteria for diagnosis of a visual disability.
  • Medical information relating to the student's needs and the status of the student's vision (static or changing) and its impact on the demands of the academic program and the functional limitations of the visual impairment. 
  • Suggestions of reasonable accommodation(s) which might be appropriate at the post secondary level are encouraged. These recommendations should be supported by the diagnosis. 

Types of Documentation
Listed below are recommended forms of documentation:

  • Visual acuity
  • Certificate of Blindness (if applicable) - additional documentation may be necessary

Qualified Professional

Listed below are recommended appropriate professionals to complete the documentation:

  • Licensed Ophthalmologist
  • Licensed Optometrist

General Guidelines for Disabilities

It is important to recognize that accommodation needs can change over time and are not always identified during the initial diagnostic process. A prior history of accommodation, without demonstration of current need, does not in and of itself warrant the provision of a like accommodation. 

Head Injury/Traumatic Brain Injury Documentation Guidelines

In order to fully evaluate requests for accommodations or auxiliary aids and to determine eligibility for services, Hill College requires documentation of your disability. The documentation you provide should include an evaluation by an appropriately licensed professional who has direct experience in working with an adult population. The documentation must make evident the current impact of the disability as it relates to the accommodation(s) requested and include a description of any and all functional limitations.

Head injury or traumatic brain injury is considered a medical and/or clinical diagnosis. Individuals qualified to render a diagnosis for these disorders are practitioners who have been trained in the assessment of head injury or traumatic brain injury. Recommended practioners include physicians, neorologists, licensed rehabilitiation and/or school psychologists, neoropsychologists and psychiatrists. Documentation should be on letterhead and contain the professional's signature and license number. The evaluator must be impartial and not related to the student being evaluated.

The general guidelines listed below are developed to assist you in working with our staff to prepare the information needed to evaluate your request(s).

Documentation

Documentation validates the functional limitations, which allows consideration for accommodation requests. The currency of documentation is dependent upon the disabling condition, the current status of the student and the student's request for accommodations. Thus, if the head injury leads to a disabling condition that is progressive, updated documentation may be needed. Each request will be evaluated on a case by case basis. Documentation should include but is not limited to: 

  • A clear diagnostic statement of a head injury or traumatic brain injury and the probable site of lesion with supporting data.
  • A summary of cognitive and achievement measures used and/or evaluation of symptoms which would include standardized scores or percentiles and which meet the criteria for diagnosis of a cognitive disorder resulting from the head injury.
  • Medical information relating to the student's needs and the status of the student's impairment (static or changing) and its impact on the demands of the academic program.
  • A statement of the functional impact of limitation of the disability on learning or other major life activity and the degree to which it impacts the individual in the learning context for which accommodations are being requested. 
  • Suggestions of reasonable accommodation(s) which might be appropriate at the post secondary level are encouraged. These recommendations should be supported by the diagnosis. 

General Guidelines for Disabilities

It is important to recognize that accommodation needs can change over time and are not always identified during the initial diagnostic process. A prior history of accommodation, without demonstration of current need, does not in and of itself warrant the provision of a like accommodation. 

Communication Disorder(s) Documentation Guidelines

In order to fully evaluate requests for accommodations or auxiliary aids and to determine eligibility for services, Hill College requires documentation of your disability. The documentation you provide should include an evaluation by an appropriately licensed professional who has direct experience in working with an adult population. The documentation must make evident the current impact of the disability as it relates to the accommodation(s) requested and include a description of any and all functional limitations.

Speech and language disorders refer to problems in communication and related areas such as oral motor function. These delays and disorders range from simple sound substitutions to the inability to understand or use language or use the oral-motor mechanism for functional speech. Professionals conducting assessments and rendering diagnoses must be qualified to do so. Documentation should be on letterhead and contain the professional's signature and license number. The evaluator must be impartial and not related to the student being evaluated.

The general guidelines listed below are developed to assist you in working with your treating/diagnosing professional(s) to prepare the information needed to evaluate your request(s).

Documentation

Documentation validates the functional limitations, which allows consideration for accommodation requests. The currency of documentation is dependent upon the nature of the communication disorder. Thus, if the condition that leads to the communication impairment is progressive, updated documentation may be needed. Each request will be evaluated on a case by case basis. Documentation should include but is not limited to: 

  • A clear statement of the communication disorder with supporting data.
  • A summary of present symptoms which meet the criteria for diagnosis of a communication disorder.
  • Medical information relating to the student's needs and the status of the student's current impairment (static or changing) and its impact on the demands of the academic program.
  • Suggestions of reasonable accommodation(s) which might be appropriate at the post secondary level are encouraged. These recommendations should be supported by the diagnosis. 

Types of Documentation

Listed below are recommended forms of documentation to the complete the documentation file:

  • Audiogram
  • Speech Language Pathologist Evaluation

Professionals

Listed below are recommended appropriate professionals to complete the documentation:

  • Licensed Audiologist
  • Licensed Speech Language Pathologist

General Guidelines for Disabilities

It is important to recognize that accommodation needs can change over time and are not always identified during the initial diagnostic process. A prior history of accommodation, without demonstration of current need, does not in and of itself warrant the provision of a like accommodation.

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Documentation Guidelines

In order to fully evaluate requests for accommodations or auxiliary aids and to determine eligibility for services, Hill College requires documentation of your disability. The documentation you provide should include an evaluation by an appropriately licensed professional who has direct experience in working with an adult population (when applicable). The documentation should make evident the current impact of the disability as it relates to the accommodation(s) requested and include a description of any and all functional limitations. Professionals conducting assessments and rendering diagnoses must be qualified to do so. Documentation should be on letterhead and contain the professional's signature and license number. The evaluator must be impartial and not related to the student being evaluated.

The general guidelines listed below are developed to assist you in working with your treating/diagnosing professional(s) to prepare the information needed to evaluate your request(s).

Documentation

Documentation validates the functional limitations, which allows consideration for accommodation requests. The currency of documentation is dependent upon the nature of the hearing loss. Thus, if the condition that leads to the hearing loss is progressive, updated documentation may be needed. Each request will be evaluated on a case by case basis. Documentation should include but is not limited to: 

  • A clear statement of the hearing impairment with supporting data.
  • A summary of present symptoms which meet the criteria for diagnosis of a hearing impairment.
  • Medical information relating to the student's needs and the status of the student's hearing (static or changing) and its impact on the demands of the academic program and functional limitations.
  • Suggestions of reasonable accommodation(s) which might be appropriate at the post secondary level are encouraged. These recommendations should be supported by the diagnosis. 

Types of Documentation

Listed below are recommended forms of documentation to the complete the documentation file:

  • Audiogram
  • Certificate of Deafness (if applicable) - additional documentation may be necessary
  • Speech Language Pathologist Evaluation

Professionals

Listed below are recommended appropriate professionals to complete the documentation:

  • Licensed Audiologist
  • Licensed Speech Language Pathologist

General Guidelines for Disabilities

It is important to recognize that accommodation needs can change over time and are not always identified during the initial diagnostic process. A prior history of accommodation, without demonstration of current need, does not in and of itself warrant the provision of a like accommodation.

Learning Disability Documentation Guidelines

In order to fully evaluate requests for accommodations or auxiliary aids and to determine eligibility for services, Hill College requires documentation of your disability. The documentation you provide should include an evaluation by an appropriately licensed professional that makes evident the current impact of the disability as it relates to the accommodation(s) requested and include a description of any and all functional limitations.

Learning Disabilities (LD) are a group of disorders manifested by significant difficulties in the acquisition and use of listening, spelling, reading, writing, reasoning or mathematical ability. These disorders are intrinsic to the individual, presumed to be due to central nervous system dysfunction and are usually first diagnosed in childhood. In addition, there may be problems in organizational skills, self-regulatory behaviors, and social skills. A learning disability is not the result of 1) mental illness, 2) visual, hearing, or motor impairments, 3) mental retardation, 4) emotional disturbance, or 5) environmental, cultural or economic disadvantaged.

Documentation

Qualified Professional Must Conduct the Evaluation

Professionals conducting these evaluations must be qualified through professional licensing/credentials as well as through extensive training in the assessment and diagnosis of learning disabilities. In addition, professionals must be able to render diagnosis of a specific learning disability according to DSM IV-TR standards and make recommendations for appropriate accommodations for adolescents and/or adults. The name, title, and professional credentials of the evaluator (including information about license and/or certification) should be included on the report. Examples of professionals considered to be qualified to evaluate specific learning disabilities might include clinical or educational psychologists, school psychologists, neuropsychologists, and certified educational diagnosticians with experience in the assessment of learning problems in adults. The evaluator must be impartial and not related to the person being evaluated. 

Testing Should be Current

Although a person diagnosed as having a qualified learning disability is typically viewed as life-long, the severity of the condition may change over time. For the most part, comprehensive testing should be conducted within the past five years. Please submit your most recent testing fo review. 

Prior Documentation

While a current assessment is always preferred, a high school plan such as an individualized education program (IEP), 504 plan and/or Summary of Performance should be submitted for review, if nothing more current is available. 

Written Report

Actual test scores should logically reflect a substantial limitation to learning for which the individual is requesting the accommodations. Documentation should also rule out any other variable that might contribute to a learning problem (i.e. visual/hearing impairments, psychological stressors, language, etc.). These are conditions for which other or additional accommodations might be recommended. 

General Guidelines for Disabilities

It is important to recognize that accommodation needs can change over time and are not always identified during the initial diagnostic process. A prior history of accommodation, without demonstration of current need, does not in and of itself warrant the provision of a like accommodation.